How to chose the best solar power bank?

Solar charger has lots of benefits. Everybody should have solar chargers for their own need. Here we are going to look how to pick solar power banks for most people.

How to chose the best solar power bank?

If you have decided to get a solar power bank, then before making a purchase, there are few things to consider and keep in mind. Getting a solar power bank that doesn’t fit your needs is a waste, therefore spend some time figuring out what do you exactly need.

Probably the most important factor is power bank’s capacity. To choose the right one, you must know what devices you’re planning to charge. Despite your device, we always advise getting at least 2000mAh battery as it can do one full smartphone charge. And again, of course, it depends on your device. So if possible, always go for the highest capacity solar power bank, but remember that higher capacity means larger batter and also more weight that can play a huge role while hiking for many days.

Brand

It’s no lie that more recognizable manufacturers usually make better products, but they are also noticeably more expensive. You definitely want to go for the best and highest quality product. The thing is that solar cells aren’t the most effective way how to harness energy. A regular solar panel transforms only about 22% of solar energy into electrical energy. However, a high-quality panel can transform twice as much (around 40%). In the result, one solar power bank can be twice effective as another one.

Rugged build

If you do plan to use your solar power bank for hiking and other outdoor activities, you probably want to get it as rugged as possible so no rain, water splashes, snow or mud could harm it. Fortunately, there are such devices.

Features

While the main purpose of solar power bank undoubtedly is recharging your electronic devices, you can also have some other features like a flashlight, multiple USB ports and attached carabiners which are extremely useful while being outdoors.

 

Our Top Picks for Solar Power Banks

1. Solar Charger Teryei 15000mAh – superb for hiking

Our first pick is Solar Charger Teryei. This is a high capacity charger, with 15000mAh you should be able to charge your smartphone at least 4 times. The manufacturer claims that this solar charging bank can be charged in 6-8 hours when charged with cable. This means that solar charging will take much longer. However, you should get enough of power for your daily smartphone needs, of course, if you’re using it only for few texts and calls.

For those who want to bring their solar power bank outdoors, this is a great pick as it features a robust and durable build. It’s made from silicone rubber meaning it’s waterproof and dustproof. You also get such features as a compass, metal hook to hang it on your backpack as well as LED Flashlight with four light modes.

2. Cobra Electronics CPP 300 SP Dual Panel Solar USB Charger

The power that solar cell outputs is proportional to the area of this solar panel, meaning if you want more effective solar charging, you need more panels. The main feature of this solar power bank is its dual panel design. Theoretically, it should charge your devices twice as fast as other solar power banks. However, you should remember that quality of the solar cell also plays a huge role.

Inside you have 6,000mAh lithium polymer battery pack which should be enough for 2-3 phone charges. It also has a cool LCD Display that shows battery level.

3. PLOCHY Solar Charger 24000mAh Power Bank

Plochy solar charger is definitely the way to go if you want a power bank with a large capacity that you can also recharge will solar power. It’s truly a quality product, everything seems very well made. The best thing about Plochy is its versatility. There are three USB ports each of them delivering up to 2.4 A as well as Apple lightning port and Android micro-USB port. The manufacturer claims that with a full charge, this solar power bank can charge iPhone 10 times or Samsung Galaxy S7 6 times and that’s a lot. If you heavily use your smartphone, this is power bank for you.

Overall, this power bank is more for those want to squeeze few extra hours from their devices rather than hiking outdoors and using it as a primary recharge source.

Huge Earthquake on New Zealand Islands

earthquake

A destructive earthquake that struck New Zealand two years ago has left its two main islands edging towards each other, and one city sinking, according to scientists.

But the margins are minimal with the gap between the North and South islands narrowing a mere 35 centimetres (13 and a half inches), while Nelson at the top of the South Island has sunk by up to 20 millimetres.

The magnitude 7.8 earthquake on November 14 initially pushed the two islands several metres closer and the unsettled fault lines have since nudged the southern landmass further north.

However, the gap from Cape Campbell, where the main rupture ended in the South Island, and the New Zealand capital Wellington at the bottom of the North Island is still more than 50 kilometres.

At least 25 fault lines ruptured in the 2016 quake, which earthquake geologist Rob Langridge from the government’s geoscience research organisation GNS Science said made it one of the most complex earthquakes observed anywhere in the world.

Fellow GNS scientist Sigrun Hreinsdottir told the Stuff website on Friday that the sheer number of faults made it difficult to distinguish which was responsible for the post-quake creep.

“In reality we are having all this creeping going on and the question is, which (fault) is the dominant factor?” Nelson, at the top of the South Island had fractionally slumped.

“The whole area is going down maybe 10 to 20 millimetres. It’s not a huge amount but it is observable at our sites,” she said.

GNS principal scientist, Kevin Berryman, said all earthquakes of 7.5 and above are very complex but it was “certainly unusual” for 25 faults to rupture simultaneously.

The Kaikoura earthquake struck just after midnight and raced north from the middle of the South Island towards Cook Strait covering 170 kilometres in about 74 seconds.

New Zealand lies in the collision zone between the Indo-Australian and Pacific tectonic plates, part of the Pacific Basin Ring of Fire, and experiences more than 15,000 earthquakes a year although only 100-150 are strong enough to be felt.